Birds

Some feral/pest birds can be a big problem for business. Most gain access into a business through loading bay areas or damaged roofing.

A feral bird infestation can cause damage to your property by dislodging roof tiles, blocking guttering, building nests and leaving droppings that can be corrosive to building material. Some feral birds can be aggressive and attack customers and employees, especially during the breeding season when they are protecting their young. Feral birds are known to carry fleas,mites, ticks, lice and other biting insects which can spread diseases and pose a serious health risk.

Bird Prevention

  • The best way to discourage birds for good is to remove their food sources, however in busy urban areas this is not always a practical solution.
  • Removing access to nesting sites (for instance by putting barriers over window ledges) can be an effective bird deterrent.
  • Make sure bin lids are secure and rubbish bags are not left in the open – gulls, especially, have sharp beaks that will make short work of bin bags.

Signs of a bird infestation problem

You can drastically reduce the length of time required to effectively control feral/pest birds if you know how to recognise the signs and take immediate action before if becomes a serious issue:
  • Birds setting on roofs or ledges
  • Bird noises including continuous bird cries, especially from young/baby birds.
  • Bird nests and nesting materials.
  • Damaged stock from pecking and bird droppings.
  • Droppings look for concentrated areas of droppings where birds roost.
  • Debris from nests and feathers as these may block guttering and drainage systems which can lead to other problems.

Diseases Carried by Birds

  • Histoplasmosis is a respiratory disease that may be fatal. It results from a fungus growing in dried bird droppings.
  • Candidiasis is a yeast or fungus infection spread by pigeons. The disease affects the skin, the mouth, the respiratory system, the intestines and the urogenital tract.
  • Cryptococcosis is caused by yeast found in the intestinal tract of pigeons and starlings. The illness often begins as a pulmonary disease and may later affect the central nervous system.
  • Salmonellosis often occurs as "food poisoning" and can be traced to pigeons, starlings and sparrows. The disease bacteria are found in bird droppings; dust from droppings can be sucked through ventilators and air conditioners, contaminating food and cooking surfaces in restaurants, homes and food processing plants.
  • Escherichia coli (E.coli). When birds peck on cow manure, the E. coli go right through the birds and the bird droppings can land on or in a food or water supply. Can lead to illnesses such as gastro-enteritis and septicaemia.
  • Bird mites are often found in nests and roosting places. They feed mainly on bird blood but will also bite humans
  • Fowl pest (also known as fowl plague). This virus can be transmitted to people when they’re exposed to faecal and other excretions from infected pigeon birds.
  • Psittacosis (also called Ornithosis or pigeon fancier's lung). This infection can be transmitted by inhaling the bacteria from dried droppings or handling feathers of infected pigeons or gulls.

Bird Control Treatments for your business

Aerobeam Professional Pest Management experienced technicians offer a range of effective bird deterrents. The feral/pest bird deterrents offered are safe, non-toxic and humane.
  • Bird Netting
    Bird netting can provide an immediate, effective and discreet solution to rid an area of pest bird problems. The nets are designed to provide 100% exclusion of birds and aim to eliminate birds from roosting and nesting in areas.
  • Bird Spikes
    Bird spikes can offer an immediate and effective solution to rid an area of feral/pest bird species. Spikes can be fitted to most outside surfaces, preventing problems associated with birds landing on ledges and leaving unsightly, hazardous droppings.
  • Electric Bird Deterrent
    The electric feral/pest bird deterrent is a cost-effective and discreet solution to keep pest birds away. A charger sends out a harmless yet noticeable pulse down the ‘track’ every two to three seconds. This electric pulse lasts only a fraction of a second. The birds are not harmed, but they do learn that the protected surface is to be avoided in the future.
  • Optical Bird Scanner
    Optical bird scanners work by reflecting light beams which make the feral/pest bird fly in another direction. It is completely harmless to the bird and will not disrupt your business operation. Only suitable for specific sites. Aerobeam Professional Pest Management technicians will determine if the optical bird scanner is suitable for your business.

Do I need professional bird pest control assistance?

The longer feral birds are allowed to nest or roost in an unwanted area, the harder it will be to remove them. Pigeons, for example, live in flocks of anywhere between 50 and 500, this means a small bird pest problem has the potential to become a large infestation. Aerobeam Professional Pest Management provide professional deterrent services which can provide effective and discreet solutions to your bird problem.

Professional bird control is not only critical to avoid damage to your property but also to minimise the health risks posed by the presence of certain birds.

Effective bird proofing requires the use of reliable and tested professional deterrents to ensure an effective, long term solution to any pest bird problem. Control and management of feral birds can sometimes be complicated due to the severity of the problem and the location. Aerobeam Professional Pest Management takes into consideration several factors which determine the best method of pest bird control. These factors include: area of application; bird species; location and access


House Sparrow

House Sparrow identification
The house sparrow is less than 15cm long. Males can be identified by the grey crown on their heads, and black throat ‘bib’. Females and young are mostly plain brown.
Description

The House sparrow is a significant pest to the food industry because of the risk of contamination from their droppings and the damage done to packaged goods.

House sparrows tend to use the same nest every year, resulting in a build up of nest debris, and insects associated with their nests.

Sparrows live for four to seven years, with up to five breeding seasons. The breeding season runs through Spring and Summer, and up to three broods of 4–6 eggs may be laid in this time.

Distribution
Australia-wide.
  • House Sparrow
    House Sparrow
  • House Sparrow
    House Sparrow
  • House Sparrow
    House Sparrow
  • House Sparrow
    House Sparrow

Indian Myna

Indian Myna identification
The Indian Myna is 25cm long. It is brown and white in colour with a dark green neck area and has a yellow beak and legs.
Description

The Indian Myna was introduced in Australia in the 1880’s in north-eastern Queensland to combat insect pests, particularly plague locusts. Since then their numbers have continued to increase throughout Australia in urban areas. They are a major pest problem particularly around schools, outdoor cafes and anywhere there is easy access to food.

Indian myna feed on insects but on food scraps also. They nest in roof cavities, palm trees and sheltered areas.

The average lifespan of four years in the wild, possibly over 12 years. They breed 4-5 glossy pale blue eggs in spring and summer.

Distribution
Australia-wide.
  • Indian Myna
    Indian Myna
  • Indian Myna
    Indian Myna
  • Indian Myna
    Indian Myna

Pigeons

Pigeons identification
Approximately 30cm long. They are usually blue-grey in colour (although other colours are common).
Description

Also known as city doves or street pigeons, they are descended from wild rock doves. They thrive in an urban environment and only require the smallest amount of shelter on buildings.

Pigeons feed on seeds, green feed, domestic scraps in and around cities and near roosting sites. Pigeons prefer to nest on ledges.

2 – 3 broods per year, with 2 eggs in each clutch. 17 – 19 day incubation period. Young birds spend 35 – 37 days in the nest.

Distribution
Australia-wide.
  • Pigeons
    Pigeons
  • Pigeons
    Pigeons
  • Pigeons
    Pigeons
  • Pigeons
    Pigeons
  • Pigeons
    Pigeons

Silver Gull

Silver Gull identification
The Silver Gull is the most common Australian gull. White with silver grey upper parts. White eye. In adult birds the bill, legs and eye-ring are bright orange-red. 38 to 43cm in length.
Description

The Silver Gull is common throughout Australia. The Silver Gull is found at virtually any watered habitat and is rarely seen far from land. Birds flock in high numbers around fishing boats as these leave or return to the coast, but seldom venture far out to sea.

As with many other gull species, the Silver Gull has become a successful scavenger, readily pestering humans for handouts of scraps, pilfering from unattended food containers or searching for human refuse at tips. Other food includes worms, fish, insects and crustaceans.

Silver Gulls nest in large colonies on offshore islands. Often two broods will be raised in a year, and both adults share nest-building, incubation and feeding duties. Eggs are laid in a shallow nest scrape, lined with vegetation.

With greater access to a wide range of dietary items, the Silver Gull has been able to increase its population in areas of human activity. Available nesting grounds appear to be the only limiting factor to population increases.

Distribution
Australia-wide.
  • Silver Gull
    Silver Gull
  • Silver Gull
    Silver Gull
  • Silver Gull
    Silver Gull
  • Silver Gull
    Silver Gull

Starlings

Starlings identification
Starlings are 19cm - 23cm long, and can be recognised by their pointed wings and short tail when flying. At first sight they appear to be plain black, but the feathers catch the light and may appear iridescent green or purple.
Description

The concentration of droppings from a large roosting flock provides a good medium for pathogenic fungi, some of which can be harmful or even fatal to humans. It is an agricultural pest of standing crops, but will also flock into cities in large numbers.

Starlings can rear up to two broods a year, in April and May. Each clutch usually consists of 4–6 eggs, the young staying in the nest for about 3 weeks. Breeding can extend into June and July if conditions are favourable.

Distribution
Australia-wide.
  • Starlings
    Starlings
  • Starlings
    Starlings
  • Starlings
    Starlings
  • Starlings
    Starlings

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We offer a complete pest control and management service.
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